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child custody Archives

Shared or sole child custody: which is best for development?

When parents are no longer cohabiting, people may assume that one or the other will take over primary custody of the children. But is this really the best scenario for most families in Ontario? Research seems to suggest that shared parenting and child custody is the best option, although historically some people have assumed the opposite to be true.

Child custody and co-parenting issues change during school year

As children across the country prepare for a new school year, newly separated and divorced parents have a few extra things to think about. Issues like child custody and expenses can look different in the summer months than they do with the responsibilities of school involved. Here are a few things divorced or separated Ontario parents should consider when preparing for the school year.

Once child custody is decided, how can parents help kids cope?

Separation and divorce can come with a host of challenges, especially for couples who have children. Ontario parents should take care to understand the emotional difficulties their children might face with the family shift. While issues such as child custody and child support are dealt with through family law, helping children cope is often a matter that families must broach at home. Here are some tips to do just that.

How to co-parent with shared child custody

Divorce isn't easy for anyone, but those with children have even more issues to worry about. Most Ontario parents working through shared child custody will need to learn how to co-parent effectively. While this can be difficult at first, good habits and a child-centered attitude can help these arrangements to work.

Parental Alienation In Custody Disputes

Some separated or divorced parents fight custody battles by manipulating their children to the extent that the child turns completely on the other parent. This is called parental alienation. One parent wants sole custody of a child, and vilifies the other parent so much that the child sees that parent negatively and doesn’t want to be with that parent. Our post this week looks at this troubling occurrence in divorce and separation cases.

Even with full child custody other parent must authorize travel

Sometimes, a person who has gone through a divorce in Ontario wants to get away from it all and relocate to another province or country. However, this could be a complicated process if that person wants to take a child along -- even if he or she has sole child custody. There are particular steps to follow before a child may travel across borders.

Child custody: What are the options for access arrangements?

When Ontario parents divorce, there are different options when it comes to access. Parents who can keep their relationship amicable may agree to reasonable access. This will allow them to make informal arrangements for child custody that could be modified to suit changing circumstances. If their relationship does not allow this, the more formal option of fixed access may be ordered.

New study confirms shared child custody benefits all

No matter the way one looks at divorce, young children will always have a hard time adjusting to the altered circumstances. The changes in their primary support systems typically bring about anxiety, which also affects the parents who try to work out child custody arrangements that will least affect the children. A new international study recently confirmed what Ontario authorities in child-related matters already knew -- spending equal amounts of time with both parents promotes the best outcome when it comes to the mental health of children of divorce.

Unusual lifestyle arrangements in Ontario child custody

It's come to be known as bird-nesting when a divorced couple decide that their children should remain in the family home while each ex-spouse alternates living there as well. Well-intentioned parents who feel that the marriage may be over but the family isn't may choose nesting as a way to acclimatize the children to divorce realities. Ontario courts would likely award joint child custody in a nesting agreement geared towards providing stability to the children of divorced parents.

Relocating children may pose dilemma in Ontario child custody

Children don't come into the world with manuals outlining their needs and instructions on how to care for them. Parenting is a continuous learning experience, particularly when life's changing fortunes challenge Ontario divorced couples to prioritize their child's needs. When child custody has been awarded, each parent takes on a legal status as either custodial parent or access parent.

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